Connecticut AFL-CIO

 

Sal Luciano, President of the Connecticut AFL-CIO, testified on Friday before the Finance Committee to urge the legislature to begin closing the wealth gap by passing a progressive revenue package.
Last week, in a rare move, the entire Connecticut Congressional delegation jointly submitted testimony in support of raising the minimum wage in the state.
On Feb. 15, just days after massive layoffs at Activision Blizzard, the AFL-CIO issued a powerful public statement of support to game developers in the United States. Its message, published in an open letter at Kotaku, was both simple and profound.

Three low-wage workers, a national economist, legislators, and a faith leader will hold a press conference on Thursday, March 7 at 10:00 a.m.

Recent News

“I’m not anti-union, but I don’t really think we need them, right?” said Double Fine head Tim Schafer while hosting yesterday evening’s Game Developers Choice Awards in San Francisco. “We’re all great here and in this show. No one here is union and...” Then the stage lights went out.

“Oh, right,” said Schafer after the lights went out. “Except for the lighting crew. I forgot they’re all union.”

A four-year fight to expand overtime pay to millions of workers may soon be over. About 1.2 million workers will win and 2.8 million will lose.

The Department of Labor is scaling back an Obama-era rule that would have doubled the maximum salary for a worker to qualify for overtime pay, according to a proposed rule the agency sent to the Office of the Federal Register for public review.

Sal Luciano, President of the Connecticut AFL-CIO, made the following statement in response to the Labor and Public Employees Committee voting in support of raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour:

“We applaud the members of the Labor Committee for voting to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2022. The passage of these bills out of committee is a critical first step in the process to help over 300,000 workers get a raise in our state.

Black leaders, activists, and organizers formed the backbone of the U.S. labor movement. Even when the forces of structural racism and segregation sought to stifle their contributions, their resolve to fight for workers’ rights alongside the cause of civil rights remained unshakable. Black women, in particular, have played an enormous role in the movement’s legacy and development.

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