News

2020’s growth in pay inequity between workers and CEOs confirms the “executive base salary reductions” touted during the COVID-19 crisis were just lip service, per this year’s AFL-CIO Executive Pay

Huge win in Connecticut for call center workers and our communities! For too long, our state has turned a blind eye to corporations that take millions of dollars in state contracts, tax breaks, and subsidies while outsourcing jobs overseas.
The General Assembly convened a special session this week with the Senate and House passing legislation legalizing recreational cannabis for adult use and the budget implementer.
It makes little sense for the U.S. government to provide tax breaks to companies that outsource America's jobs, and yet the recently passed Republican tax law makes the problem worse.

A workers’ rights case before the Supreme Court this week could have a dramatic impact on all of our lives. Janus v. AFSCME is a case that is designed to dramatically reduce dues and starve unions that are representing workers at the bargaining table. The Janus case is being pushed by some big corporations and CEOs as part of their well-funded attacks against collective bargaining.

“Stand up. Rise up. Lift up. No justice, no peace.”

That was the rallying cry of more than 350 union workers on the steps of the Connecticut Supreme Court in Hartford on Monday. Workers from across the state joined with legislators in speaking out to protect the rights and freedom of workers to negotiate together and fight for decent and equitable pay, affordable health care, quality schools, and vibrant communities.

Each year on April 28th, we gather together to honor the memory of those workers who have lost their lives because of their job in the course of the past year. During the ceremonies, we speak of the sacrifices made by these workers and of the families left behind and we are inspired to work harder on behalf of all workers.

This year the Connecticut AFL-CIO Health and Safety Committee is offering a scholarship essay contest to inspire high school seniors to think about the importance of workplace health and safety.

When he finally unveiled his infrastructure plan on Monday, President Donald Trump offered cities and states negative $40 billion.

At its recent bi-coastal meeting, the SAG-AFTRA National Board of Directors unanimously approved a Code of Conduct on Sexual Harassment to Advance Equity, which is part of a program to combat harassment and strive toward workplace equity called the Four Pillars of Change, according to an announcement.

“At its most basic, this code will — ultimately — help better define what harassment is and what members’ rights are in those situations,” SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Carteris said in the release.

The U.S. Supreme Court soon will be the stage of one of the most consequential fights in the history of the American worker.

Anyone concerned with the future of middle-class jobs in our nation deserves to get the facts. Rather than sifting through the complexities of this legal battle, the goal of this article is to make clear to readers the real-life implications of this impending court decision.

Congress should protect worker freedom and uphold the sovereignty of Native American tribes, not pit the two against each other. Working people must have a legally enforceable right to form unions and negotiate together with the tribal enterprises that employ them. It’s fair, it’s democratic and it’s one important step toward an economy that works for all working people.